FAQs about Group Homes and our Services

  1. Who is eligible for a group home placement?

    Anyone living with Dementia and other care needs

  2. What are the services available?

    In addition to high quality accommodation, we offer our residents medical assistance and support with many everyday activities. These include:

    • Assistance with every-day routines like showering dressing and meals.
    • Developing a person-centred individualized plan for each resident.
    • Planning and assisting our residents in purposeful and meaningful engagement.
    • Helping maintain as much independence as possible.
  3. Who is eligible for a group home placement?

    Anyone living with Dementia and other care needs

  4. Fees/costs involved

    Please ask for an individualized quote

  5. What kinds of activities do you offer to residents?

    Under the assistance and guidance of our homemakers, we encourage residents to be involved in household and daily activities like: Under the assistance and guidance of our homemakers, we encourage residents to be involved in household and daily activities like:

    • Deciding on menus and cooking the daily meals
    • Shopping
    • Gardening
    • Laundry
    • Visits to local shopping centres to buy food and other essentials
    • Running errands, like visiting the hairdresser
    • Going on outing to places of interest
  6. Can family members visit?

    Yes, visits are always welcome at Group Homes. We actively encourage the friends and family of residents to stop by for a visit, to take residents out for lunch, or to spend the afternoon with them at the local shopping centre.

  7. How do I arrange a tour/visit?

    To arrange a tour of one of our Group Homes, please contact our head office on 1300 015 406.

FAQ about Dementia and Residential Care:

  1. What is dementia? Is it a disease?

    Dementia is not a disease. In fact, dementia describes a large range of symptoms that are associated memory loss and the decline of mental abilities. This will lead to changes in the sufferer’s behaviour and eventually reduce their ability to perform everyday tasks and maintain/develop relationships.

  2. What is vascular dementia?

    Vascular dementia is an umbrella term for dementia that is associated with issues of blood circulation to the brain. It is the second most common cause of dementia (with Alzheimer’s being the number one cause).
    Symptoms of vascular dementia can include:

    • Memory loss
    • Developing a person-centred individualized plan for each resident.
    • Confusion
    • Problems with verbal communication (speaking or understanding speech)
    • Vision loss

    Symptoms can vary, and depend on the extent of the damage to the blood vessel as well as the part of the brain that is affected.

  3. What is the difference between Dementia and Alzheimer’s?

    Dementia is a term for a group of symptoms related to the impairment of memory, reasoning, and judgment impairment. Alzheimer’s disease on the other hand is a common cause of dementia – affecting up to 70% of dementia sufferers. In short, dementia is a group of symptoms, while Alzheimer’s disease is the cause of some of those symptoms.

  4. What causes dementia and is it hereditary?

    Please ask for an individualized quote

  5. What kinds of activities do you offer to residents?

    Dementia is caused by gradual changes and damage to the brain. The most common cause is diseases that degenerate brain cells (resulting in them dying quicker than normal). generally a result of an increase in irregular proteins in the brain, which can causes a decline in a person’s mental physical abilities. The levels of irregular proteins are different for each type of dementia. In the majority of cases, dementia is not inherited. However, some causes of dementia are inherited, like Huntington’s disease and some cases of frontotemporal dementia. Most cases of Alzheimer’s disease are not inherited.

  6. What is residential care, home care and person-centred care?

    • Residential Care refers to the care and services that are offered to those living in a care facility, Generally, residential care facilities do not just include accommodation; they can also provide assistance with everyday activities, nursing and social activities.
    • Home care is a level of care that is provided by home care workers. They will visit people in their own homes to provide any necessary assistance, helping them to live as independent a life as they can.
    • Person Centred Care is when the treatment and care provided by health and age care providers’ places the person at the centre of their own care. What this means is that the experiences, needs and feelings of the person being cared for will be the centre of the caring process.
    • This is one of the benefits of being in a Group Home. At Group Homes we see the person first, not the dementia – so we can ensure that the care we give will always be focused entirely on the person not the symptoms.
  7. What is the difference between a nursing home and Group home?

    The biggest difference between a Group home and a nursing home is the philosophy of care, the small size of our homes and the level of medical assistance and care that is offered.